Malema not calling for ‘wholesale, blanket nationalisation’

2012-09-19 11:31
Expelled ANC Youth League president Julius Malema has likened critics of the nationalisation of mines to those who opposed the end of apartheid.

Malema was asked by Talk Radio 702 host John Robbie today how the nationalisation of mines could take place and whether it was plausible.

“You sound like people who opposed our struggle for freedom,” answered Malema.

“You are arguing exactly like they argued, that we cannot run the economy ... I am telling you that it can sound difficult until it is done.”

Malema said the government should “not necessarily” expropriate mines, but should instead use Botswana as a model, where the state owned 51% of mine shareholding.

“Why are you not having a problem with Botswana? (Mine companies) are more than willing to work with government in Botswana, but when they come here they are refusing,” Malema said.

“I’m not calling for wholesale, blanket nationalisation. We still encourage the involvement of the private sector. We’re talking about greater control and participation of the state in the economy.”

Malema also responded to questions about reports that the Hawks had concluded their corruption probe and that he would soon be arrested.

He said he was not aware of any intention to arrest him.

“I hear that from you at the start of the programme. I hear that from papers,” Malema said.

“I’ve been ‘getting arrested’ since 2009,” he said.

Malema said that if the police wanted to arrest him, they would not have to “create an unnecessary scene”.

“Those that are looking for me, they don’t have to create an unnecessary scene, they just have to call me – ‘Mr. Malema, report to Polokwane Police Station at 9am’ – and I’ll be there,” he said.

Malema also told Robbie that he would return to the ANC, regardless of the outcome of the party’s national elective conference in Mangaung.

Malema said he was expelled from the party because a “faction” in the ANC, which was led by President Jacob Zuma, was determined to be re-elected to positions.

“I was booted out by those who felt threatened by my presence in the organisation,” Malema said. “They thought my presence threatened their re-election at Mangaung.”

He said that once the pressure of the election contest was over, he would be welcomed back into the ANC.

“Once they get re-elected or not re-elected, we will still be welcomed back into the organisation because they will be cool-headed and they will no longer be afraid of the unknown,” Malema said.

He said that as an expelled member, no administrative rules prevented him from rejoining the party.

“Being expelled from the ANC means that you can wake up tomorrow and apply to be a member of the ANC,” Malema said.

“I’m not rejoining the ANC, I’m joining as a new member of the ANC.”

Malema said he still had a good relationship with his branch and participated in its meetings.

“It’s my branch. I’ve never had bad blood in my mind. I’ve got bad blood with those ones who have an ambition to be elected,” Malema said.

Robbie asked Malema about his continued commitment to the ANC and whether that commitment was reasonable following his expulsion.

“But you’re living in cuckoo land. You say you’ll die for the ANC, all that wonderful stuff, but the ANC has kicked you out. Aren’t you living a dream?” asked Robbie.

“No, no, no,” answered Malema. “I would have walked away if I was an opportunist.”