News

An artist who made ghetto metaphors seem effortless: ProKid is remembered

2018-08-09 11:49

Condolences continue to pour in for award-winning South African hip-hop star Linda Mkhize — better known as ProKid — after he succumbed to a seizure attack on Wednesday evening at the tender age of 37.

Mkhize’s family confirmed in a statement that the artist died after experiencing a “severe seizure” while visiting a friend in the Johannesburg CBD.

According to the family, the veteran hip-hop artist was declared dead on the scene by paramedics just after 8pm.

The late musician has been remembered as a pioneer of the hip-hop genre in the township and an inspiration to other artists.

“We are deeply saddened by the tragic passing of a lyrical genius, pioneering hip-hop artist, Linda Mkhize. ProKid took rapping in African languages to great heights and he will go down as one of the greatest and most influential hip-hop artists of his generation,” said arts and culture minister, Nathi Mthethwa.

His former manager and friend, Mpho Motsoaledi, expressed shock over Mkhize’s passing and added that the music industry would never be the same without the late musician.

ProKid took rapping in African languages to great heights producing hits such as Ghetto Science, Woz’uzobabona and many other songs that celebrated township life.

Mkhize did not let his humble township upbringing deter him, instead he made it the inspiration to his music even titling his first ever single Soweto in honour of his township.

Veteran music producer Oscar Mdlongwa – popularly known as Oskido – saluted his fellow colleague Mkhize, saying that through his resilience and subsequent success ProKid had paved the way for a lot of other rappers from the townships.


Kiernan Jarryd Forbes, known as AKA, also sent out a condolence message saying Mkhize had afforded him the chance, not only to showcase his talent as an artist, but also as a producer.


Mikhize’s long-time colleague Siyabonga Metane, better known as Slikour, said the late musician had “made ghetto metaphors and punchlines seem effortless and you birthed a whole generation of hip-hop artists inspired by his style”.


Next on City Press

Read News24’s Comments Policy

24.com publishes all comments posted on articles provided that they adhere to our Comments Policy. Should you wish to report a comment for editorial review, please do so by clicking the 'Report Comment' button to the right of each comment.

Comment on this story
0 comments
Add your comment
Comment 0 characters remaining

August 19 2018